A Canadian Ancient Mariner’s view of Current Affairs.

When I rage about the climate, politics, loss of privacy or other current controversies I end up with the thought “why should I even care? I am not going to be the one who has to live on this earth through what is sure to come”. But I do care. Sharing what I write is something I can do.

I am a member of what is known as the Silent generation. Born after the great depression but before the end of the second world War. We are also known as the “lucky few”. The only modern generation who are smaller than the one that preceded it. I was born near its end.

I was too young to know that second world war even happened or that my Father was involved. I was still in grade school when Korea ended. Vietnam was an American war and my view coloured by the dissenters I met who had moved to Canada. The closest I got to war was the 1962 Cuban crisis when as a sailor in the RCN I was recalled from leave and sent to sea as part of the NATO blockade. This was to be a Atomic confrontation and as usual the Canadian Navy was ill prepared. My berth was an old WW2 Frigate with few watertight hatches let alone airtight ones. Great soul searching occurred to make the decision to return. I did. I was 20 years old. From then to retirement were pretty much the glory years of the 20th century. It was mired only by Pierre Trudeau declaring Martial Law and the Harper years. We were also the last generation of First world children to be susceptible the uncontrolled ravages of Polio. I was lucky and not so lucky. (That will be another story). My world view is a result of my membership in this grouping. Spending most of my working life at sea was another. You see, when you go to sea, you step into another environment. What happens ashore has no bearing on your life until you step ashore again maybe a month or more in the future. The sea and its challenges are your reality. Nothing will change that. In the early to late 20th century that also meant no day to day news, no TV, no papers, and intermittent radio. The world would unfold as it will and you would find out about it when you were back on land. Communications available to today’s mariner have changed access to information but not the reality of being at sea. At sea, as an Officer in Command, the cardinal rule is verify – verify – verify. Never trust a single source. This is the root of navigation. It has been since the beginning of time. It is the only way to get home. Which is the point is it not. We are realists. With me this has carried over to life ashore. My practice today is to use @twitter to gather news and views remembering that cardinal rule. I left Facebook when I lost control of what it fed me. Also I have no trust in its creator and owner. My views on what is important in Canadian civil society are already listed. But to expand. It is imperative that we retain our control of our digital footprint. It is no different than the writing in a personal diary of old or mailing a letter that you have sealed with your tongue. If paranoid, you might even have affixed a wax seal. Encryption of your data is the digital equivalent. To do with climate I believe the tipping point is past. we may mitigate its results some but I am not hopeful. The NeoLiberal Political era is far from over. This is true in Canada as it is in much of the world. The only difference here between the Liberals and Conservatives is which Bay Street Lawyers they use. As well as a smile vs a scowl.

This also comes to mind. It is from a audio interview given by my father (who was also a mariner) in the 1970’s on being caught in the Great Depression. He, his mother and sister were building a summer cottage on Cortes Island, part of the Discovery Islands, in British Columbia.

We saw this same “BOOM” with the crash of oil and may see worse with the dawn of Trump.

Update on Tofino whale watching incident.

Update — TSB investigation into passenger vessel Leviathan II near Tofino, BC

http://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/medias-medi…7-20151027.asp
A bit more information here: http://blog.tadroberts.ca/
And here: http://www.nauticapedia.ca/dbase/Que…2-112&id=32752
TSB Full reports so far: http://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/enquetes-in…7/m15p0347.asp

Another guess based on some known facts

The Leviathan 2 was built for Crown Zellerback as a high speed workboat in the late 80’s. Her shallow draft and speed tend to point to use as a riverboat (Fraser Watershed.) The lakes shown below are access to valleys that were full of high grade timber. The logs fed mills on the Fraser river. Also could have worked the Clayquot Sound area near Tofino.

image

Google was unable to find any photos. My guess would be a open back deck for cargo and seating for under 12 to avoid passenger rules. No wonder stability is a issue.

Tourboat sinking off Tofino

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First off the Transport safety board will determine what happened. The crew and passengers will be interviewed. The ship will be inspected. Weather conditions will be noted. As in the majority of incedents, it will be a combination of factors.

My guess is “stability” played a part. As did a “rouge” wave. Passengers have reported that “nobody saw the wave coming”. That suggests compacancy may have been in play.. It should be noted that being an “armchair” sailor is easy and easily wrong.